Cisse shorts

It was about time to sew some pants again, here at the Abfabulies home. I’d had the Cisse pattern from Zonen 09 lying around for quite some time now, and now was as good as ever a time to start using it.

I went on a fabric hunt in my own stash, and I found some petrol blue ribbed velvet.

Originally, I planned to sew long pants, but when it turned out that I would have to be pretty precise if I wanted to use this fabric, I chose the safe way out: a short version.

While searching for fabric, I also came by my stash of binding. The fluorescent green that I used before when I made our boy’s school backpack drew my attention, and I added some in the pockets.

Cisse - Zonen 09

And in the side seams.

Cisse - Zonen 09

And while I was at it, in the back seams as well.

Cisse - Zonen 09

In between, I also bought a Silhouette cameo. Since then, I’ve been pushing quite some heat transfer through it, but I’ll show the results of that in another post. In my heat transfer stash (really, I need to work myself through all these different stashes) I also found fluorescent green. I was starting to recognise a pattern here! I used the Cameo to cut some stars, and pressed them on.

Cisse - Zonen 09

Since 3-year olds aren’t usually that handy yet with buttons, I used elastic and jersey instead, as I had done before when I made some Jacob pants and underwear. Never change a winning team!

Cisse - Zonen 09

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any fluorescent jersey, so I took a slighly less bright green version. I attached the elastic inside the jersey to the fabric as well, to avoid that it would start curling inside afterwards. Time will tell whether that was a smart move or not.

Cisse - Zonen 09

It took me quite some time to finish these pants. I copied the pattern in February already, and I made slow progress since. Not because it’s a difficult pattern, but simply because, well, me. But I don’t regret this slow progress. In fact, taking my time resulted in more precise finishing, less mistakes being made and a better eye for details. Maybe I should work this slow every time I make something.

How about you? What does your finishing usually look like? Better not to look at the inside of the garments you make? Every stitch done perfectly? And no lying 😉