Upcycling towels – Here’s how you do that

Towels live forever, in this household. Well, almost forever, that is. The old towels that I took with me from home when I went to live on my own moved along with me through each stage in my life. Now and then, one doesn’t make it. Depending on how it ends of this one, it sometimes gets upcycled.

That’s what happened to my old Minnie Mouse towel. Once, in a past life, that towel survived many swimming classes. Once, it was white, with a very nice Minnie Mouse printed on it. Over time, it became more grey, and Minnie started to look a bit dishevelled. The edges started fraying, and it was clear Minnie wasn’t going to be able to go on much longer. Unfortunately, I have no pictures to prove this, you’ll just have to believe me (although it wouldn’t surprise me if my mum would be able to dig one up after reading this post)

Feeling only slightly melancholic, I took out scissors and ruler, and started cutting. Squares and rectangles. I overlocked the edges of each single one, and tada:

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  • 7 makeup removal pads
  • 3 cleaning rags
  • 21 cheeky wipes

And one added example of cutting up a towel with print? You can always claim it’s a puzzle afterwards.

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How about you? What happens to your towels when they start fraying? Do you recycle them, or do they go somewhere else?

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Johnny the hobby horse

We had a stick lying around the house. A nice and thick one. One that was asking to be turned into a hobby horse. Not just for the stick, but also for Ronny, our first horse. It was getting a bit lonely.

Sjonnie het stokpaard

Hobby horse number 2, Johnny, was born out of a torn sock. One with a big-toe hole. So I cut out an extra hole on the other side, and sewed some black felt behind it. Now Johnny has 2 nostrils.

Sjonnie het stokpaard

As for the rest, I made Johnny in the same way as Ronny. Except that Johnny has curly hair. That’s because the hair yarn was part of an overzealously knit scarf I made for myself (so long it was getting dangerous to cycle), and that I frogged a bit after it was finished.

Johnny the hobby horse

I guess I could spray some water on to straighten it out again. But where’s the fun in that 😉

Sjonnie het stokpaard

Do any of you ever make clothes out of torn garments?

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Hobby horse from a lonely sock

Our little guy is an outsider. Literally. The more he can be outside, the better. Staying inside drives him crazy. Running outside, that what he wants to do. Most of the time just that little bit faster than his little legs can cary him. Favourite place to run: the woods.

For some kind of reason that my mummy mind doesn’t quite get, running goes better when you have a stick. Not to lean on, to hold onto. The thicker the stick, the better. So sticks are switched for larger ones in between. Now and then a dog walking past can grab hold of it as well, but that’s another story. Sometimes – yet rarely – the perfect stick is found. In that case, that stick has to come home with us. Of course.

So yes, we are the proud owners of a couple of sticks. And sometimes, they do come in handy. To make a hobby horse, for example.

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Making a hobby horse doesn’t take that much time. This one is made of a lonely, lost sock, a stick that was just as lonely, some yarn, some rope, and some felt. And some stuffing, of course.

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Its ears and hair are made as described in this pin. Its eyes are felt circles that I sewed on top. The very small nostrils exist of embroidery yarn that’s knotted at the end (and that have already disappeared into the horse. Larger knots next time!).

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The stick is from the park near our place.

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Our little guy loves it. He’d love to have a whole riding school. So I think our collection of sticks may grow soon. Fortunately, this house does contain quite a number of lonely socks waiting for a new destination.

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Hi-Yo Silver! Away!

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What do you do, with those lonely socks?