Cisse shorts

It was about time to sew some pants again, here at the Abfabulies home. I’d had the Cisse pattern from Zonen 09 lying around for quite some time now, and now was as good as ever a time to start using it.

I went on a fabric hunt in my own stash, and I found some petrol blue ribbed velvet.

Originally, I planned to sew long pants, but when it turned out that I would have to be pretty precise if I wanted to use this fabric, I chose the safe way out: a short version.

While searching for fabric, I also came by my stash of binding. The fluorescent green that I used before when I made our boy’s school backpack drew my attention, and I added some in the pockets.

Cisse - Zonen 09

And in the side seams.

Cisse - Zonen 09

And while I was at it, in the back seams as well.

Cisse - Zonen 09

In between, I also bought a Silhouette cameo. Since then, I’ve been pushing quite some heat transfer through it, but I’ll show the results of that in another post. In my heat transfer stash (really, I need to work myself through all these different stashes) I also found fluorescent green. I was starting to recognise a pattern here! I used the Cameo to cut some stars, and pressed them on.

Cisse - Zonen 09

Since 3-year olds aren’t usually that handy yet with buttons, I used elastic and jersey instead, as I had done before when I made some Jacob pants and underwear. Never change a winning team!

Cisse - Zonen 09

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any fluorescent jersey, so I took a slighly less bright green version. I attached the elastic inside the jersey to the fabric as well, to avoid that it would start curling inside afterwards. Time will tell whether that was a smart move or not.

Cisse - Zonen 09

It took me quite some time to finish these pants. I copied the pattern in February already, and I made slow progress since. Not because it’s a difficult pattern, but simply because, well, me. But I don’t regret this slow progress. In fact, taking my time resulted in more precise finishing, less mistakes being made and a better eye for details. Maybe I should work this slow every time I make something.

How about you? What does your finishing usually look like? Better not to look at the inside of the garments you make? Every stitch done perfectly? And no lying 😉

Foxy pockets trousers

We already had an owl version of the Jacob trousers, and a fox version soon took over my thoughts too.

Jacob met vossenstreken

For this one, I went back to my pile of hubby trousers that are ready to be recycled. Why they just keep on piling up? A while ago, there was a screw protruding from below his bicycle saddle. That screw kept stroking my hubby’s toosh, not knowing that I’m the only one with that privilege. To keep a long story short, this screw ended up making a hole in each one of hubby’s trousers. Except for this hole, the fabric was still in good condition. So I piled these trousers up, and they are coming of good use now.

Jacob met vossenstreken

Making smaller trousers out of bigger trousers, it’s quite handy. Although I must admit I’m starting to run out of fabric when it comes to these Jacob trousers. Flared legs need more fabric, and size 98 Jacob trousers will be the largest ones I can make from the bigger ones.

Anyway, recycling trousers means you measure everything out precisely, to make sure you get each part cut. And then I made a rookie mistake: I cut 2 left back legs. And I did not have enough fabric left to cut another right one. Sigh. Time to improvise.

Jacob met vossenstreken

I used some of the fabric that I was about to use for the foxy back pockets to add a strip somewhere in between the right back leg. Utmost concentration to make sure I would get it right. And still I almost made the same mistake again.

For the pockets, I rounded the corners of the pocket flap, and I used white cotton to make that flap. To turn it into a fox, I used red-brown nicky velours.

Jacob met vossenstreken

Its nose is a kamsnaps button. The eyes I made out of flex foil.

Jacob met vossenstreken

At first I refitted the original waist band, but just as with that other pair of recycled trousers it turned out that this made it more difficult to pull them up and down. So I cut everything loose again, and I cut another strip of the red-brown fabric. Since it’s a bit stretchy, it could serve as binding.

Jacob met vossenstreken

It does make it a lot easier to get to the potty in time (kind of a must, if you are a toddler).

Jacob met vossenstreken

And while I was cutting loose waist bands anyway, I got the other pair out again as well, and replaced the waist band with binding too.

Jacob met vossenstreken

Looks a lot flashier, doesn’t it?

Do you recycle cloths now and then? Or do your bicycles know to keep their screws to themselves?

Used materials

  • Main fabric: Corduroy from a recycled pair of trousers
  • Waist band, added strip and fox nose: nicky velours from my cousin’s bag
  • Fox face: white cotton
  • Nose: kamsnaps
  • Eyes: Flex foil

Jacob – Owl version

Jacob number 3 turned out to be another one in corduroy.
Jacob - Uiltjesversie
Level up for this version: pleated pockets.
Jacob - Uiltjesversie
And of course I had to go the extra mile: owl pockets.
Jacob - Uiltjesversie
Now we have someone walking around with eyes on his back(side)!
BIMG_5250

How to make owl pockets

What do you need?

  • Fabric for the pockets
  • Scrap fabric for the owl’s nose
  • Scrap fabric for the owl’s eyes
  • Buttons for the eyes
  • Fusible web: to attach the application

The pocket part

  1. Round the bottom corners of the pocket on the pattern.Jacob - Uiltjesversie
  2. Draw the pattern on your fabric, and cut the pockets out.
  3. With a large stitch, sew 2 rows next to each other in the seam of the rounded corners. Leave some thread.
  4. Pull the ends of your thread on both sides, to gather your fabric. Do this until you like how the corner is rounding up.
  5. Fold the seam inward, and iron.
  6. Make the flap now, before you continue with step 7.
  7. Put the flap on top of your pocket, to see what it will look like once you sew them onto your trousers.
  8. Decide where you want the owl’s nose to come, and cut the nose out of a piece of scrap fabric.
  9. Sew the nose onto the pocket, appliqué-style.
  10. Sew the pocket onto your trousers.

Jacob - Uiltjesversie

The flap

  1. Round the bottom corners of the flap on the pattern.
  2. Draw a rounded wedge in the middle of the flap. Jacob - Uiltjesversie
  3. Draw the pattern on your fabric, and cut the flap 2 times.
  4. Put the right sides of the flaps on each other, and sew them together, leaving the upper seam open.
  5. Clip the edges.
  6. Turn the flap, and iron. Topstitch if desired.
  7. Decide where you want the eyes to come, and cut them from some scrap fabric.
  8. Sew the eyes onto the flap, appliqué-style.
  9. Decide where the buttons need to come on the flap, and sew the buttonholes.
  10. Use the flap to decide where the owl’s nose should come (see the pocket part)
  11. Sew the flap onto your trousers, after you’ve sewed the pocket on already.
  12. Sew the buttons onto the pocket.

Jacob - Uiltjesversie

Used materials

  • Blew corduroy: Juffertje Uil
  • Appliqué fabric: From the scrap pile
  • Buttons: From the button pile

Jacob - Uiltjesversie

Recycled Jacob

After the previous Jacob I sewed turned out to be so easy, I aimed higher for this second one. With fold. With pockets. And with application.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

Gerecycleerde Jacob

I recycled one of hubby’s trousers to make these. Doing so made it easy for myself, since I could simply reuse the waistband. With belt loops.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

And with nice finishing on the insde.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

To keep these boyish enough, I used some of my scrap fabric to apply a tree on one of the pipes. An apple tree.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

I’m not quite sure why, but this pair is harder to put on than the previous pair. I suppose it’s linked to the type of fabric. This fabric is more rigid, so less stretchy, than the corduroy I used for my previous pair. I’ve also wondered whether the fold has something to do with it. All in all they do make these trousers a bit smaller.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

Once I get them on, the waisteband is a bit loose, making me want to use the buttonhole elastics to make them smaller again.

Gerecycleerde Jacob

No matter what, it does suit our little boy nicely. So yes, Jacob number 3 is on its way. To be continued.

  • Pattern: Jacob – Zonen 09
  • Fabric: A pair of hubby’s trousers, scrap fabric for application

Flower Power Jacob

Zonen 09, that means patterns that are here to stay, just like Burda or Vogue. Trendy patterns, for trendy sons.

A son, that I had. The Jacob pattern too. A son who fitted into the smallest size, for that I had to wait a bit. But look, I got there eventually. And pragmatic as we are, I made a bigger size already. Calculating in some growth.

Flower Power Jacob

The fabric I used is corduroy I got at Vermiljoen. I only had 70 cm, so to save some fabric I made this first version without pockets.

Flower Power Jacob

I also chose for a faux fly and buttonhole elastics, making it easy for our little guy to get his trousers on and off. Now that the potty training is ongoing, that comes in really handy.

Flower Power Jacob

For this pair, I left out the trademark fold of the Jacob. Not because I don’t like it, on the contrary, but I was a bit afraid that the combination corduroy-flowers-fold would be a bit OTT. Personally, I think the flowers are already pretty close to OTT on their own, to be honest.

Flower Power Jacob

But our little boy seems to like them.

Flower Power Jacob

The Jacob pattern is really easy to make. The explanation is so clear, that it made me feel as if I can sew just about anything. So next time, I’m taking it up a notch. For Jacob number 2, I’m adding the fold. And pockets.

Happy Saint Patrick’s day!

I’m a baby clothes magnet. Seriously, they come flying to me from every direction. From cousins, friends, friends of friends. Super handy, and they are all adorable. And once in a while, one of those pieces is even cuter than all the rest. Like this cute retro Småfolk overall.
Retro broekje
I loved it so much that I was determined to draw a pattern for it. I already had the retro fabric, I won it last year from Ottobre. Isn’t it just perfect for Saint Patrick’s day?
Retro broekje
And so it happened. Slightly slower than I had planned, though. My son was size 62 when I chose this fabric, but now he’s getting very close to 74. Which meant I was short of fabric, all of a sudden.
Retro broekje
To solve that problem, I cut the shoulder straps and added elastic bias binding. The same I’d use to finish the shoulder strap edges.
Retro broekje
I didn’t sew the inside edges of the trousers closed, but I used press buttons instead. This should make it easier to change nappies (the original version didn’t have these, so I had to get the whole thing off all of the time). Unfortunately, I only had supermarket press buttons lying around, the kind you have to sew on, and they aren’t the best quality. They open really easily, so that may pose a problem once my little guy starts crawling.
Retro broekje
It was the first time that I used elastic bias binding (I always thought it quite confusing, fabric in tubes), and it was also the first time that I used my serger to get a project together. And I must say, it went really well, mainly thanks to Mamasha’s tutorial.
Retro broekje
I still have other Ottobre jersey fabric lying around that I won then. Maybe I should start making some t-shirts for my little guy soon enough, before he gets too big for that fabric as well. Although he still has to grow into these trousers as well.
Retro broekje
And in his bike.
Retro broekje
And to all those cousins, friends and friends of friends I’d like to say: please keep those baby clothes coming. I am and will be grateful into eternity.
Retro broekje

Soul mates

Some weekends ago, we had my hubby’s big 30 retro party. Theme: Soul. That was because disco would have been too easy 😉

My husband asked me to make him a pair of flared retro trousers. Since I had made him trousers before, I just took the old pattern that I already had and flared it.

retro trousers

Of course, I wanted to match his costume, so I made a dress for myself as well. Unfortunately, I only had 4 days to do so, so I got a bit stressed. I wanted to make something that looked like it once belonged to The Supremes. In the end, I came up with this:

retro dress

Not as glamourous as I wanted it to be, but at least we matched!

The party was great, by the way. Too bad I forgot to take a picture of our matching costumes 🙁 Luckily, Arlette is always ready to show off some clothes.

Hubby retro trousers

My husband is turning 30 in June. Big day, so big party coming up! And big parties ask for themes of course. And themes in their turn ask for costumes. So guess what I’ll be sewing the coming months…
I’m not supposed to say anything about the theme yet. I can only say that the party is 22 May. And that I am thinking about what fabric best to use for retro trousers.
Update soon!

Hubby trousers

I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t call this blog “Knitty crochety” and then added a sewing project as a first project. So hey, it’s me!

I made a pair of trousers for my husband. The pattern is based on a burda pattern, but the original pattern has flaps for each pocket. Since this was the fourth time that I stitched a pair like these, I decided to leave the flaps out. They take a lot of time to do anyway, and I wanted to try a different technique. For the back pockets, I just ignored that flaps were mentioned, and added a classic pair of back pockets.

trousers
For the side pockets, I decided to replace the flaps by zippers. I used velvet for this pair of trousers, and as we all know, you always have to pay attention to the nap or pile. While I’m convinced I did pay attention to this, I still managed to get the side pockets on upside down. Luckily, it ended up having a special effect, so now these trousers look really creative and original. My husband didn’t care about this flaw, he’s already waiting for the next pair…