We wish you a washi Christmas

Washi Christmas

After 2 faithful years, our cardboard Christmas tree gave up on us. Not because it wasn’t sturdy enough, far from it, but because the renovation dust got a bit too much for it. So I gave it a proper fairwell and added it to the paper to be recycled.

So I searched for a new alternative. At that time, I hadn’t heard about adopting a tree yet. And since we still are a bit short in space, we decided to go for a washi tree instead. No space required, and both cat and toddler proof. Win-win.

Apart from a Christmas tree, a couple of reindeer seemed to be hiding in our washi tape stash as well.

Washi Christmas

Hubby was on a roll. Maybe I should put some washi tape underneath the Christmas tree…

Washi Christmas

The only downside is that I have no clue on how to add Christmas lights in a washi tree. So we added them to the cargo bike instead. Safety first.

Cargo bike Christmas

Ho ho ho!

Washi Christmas

(And just in case you were wondering why there is a cardboard box underneath the Christmas tree, let’s just say that I’m faster at wrapping presents than hubby.)

Lada Lover

Meet Boris.
Lada lover
 For the Jeremy Clarksons among you: a Lada Vaz 2101, 1200s, built in 1985. For the laymen: an old soviet car in mint condition.
Lada lover
My brother bought this car earlier this year, and he absolutely loves it. And he’s not the only one. Everywhere you go, there’s always someone who wants to have a chat about it, or who has a loving memory about it. A real ice breaker.
Lada lover
My brother considers this car a bit as his child. Or his twin brother, since he was built in 1985 as well. The way he looks at it, or talks about her, I’d call it real love. And you should tell everyone in the world about your real love.
Lada lover
So I went to Hema and bought 2 grey t-shirts and some transfer paper. I asked hubby nicely whether he had an idea about what we could do with the Lada logo. Luckily he understood and got going immediately. And one p(r)int and hot iron later, we ended up with this:
Lada lover
A big logo and a small one, so my brother can still decide how big his Lada love is.
Both t-shirts ended up under the Christmas tree. And somewhat later on facebook, in the post “Best Christmas present ever”. Mission accomplished, I’d daresay.

I still have one logo left, its size in between the other 2. Maybe I should iron it on a pair of boxers…
Lada lover

How to make a cardboard Christmas tree

christmas
Renovating a house while living in it kind of means that you are camping in your own home. And that means that most of your stuff is hidden away in the attic (and that the things you need will always be at the back and at the bottom of that attic, but that’s a different story).
It also means that Christmas decorations are hidden away in that far corner. I mean, did you ever take your Christmas gear on a camping trip? So when it’s the season to be jolly, it means I try to improvise on how to decorate the house a tiny bit without taking up too much room. Last year, this was the result:
Merry x-mas
And don’t worry, I did not waste any of those post-its. Each and every single one of them was reused as a grocery shopping list or to get my planning going.
This year, I wanted to do something with the pile of cardboard boxes we had lying around. We had just unpacked and assembled the cargo bike in Ikea style, so I had a big blank cardboard box to get going. Resulting in this Christboard tree:
Christboard tree / kerstonboom

And yes, it’s true. Only a quarter of the thing has been painted, and it’s covered in knee dents. But let’s just call that authenticity. And see it as a tip: Don’t sit on your cardboard while drawing the tree.

What do you need?

  • 2 large sheets of cardboard (105 cm / 42 in high, and 80 cm / 32 in wide)
  • 1 geometry triangle
  • 1 long ruler
  • 1 pair of scissors and/or 1 cutter knife
  • 1 cutting board
  • a couple of gold spray paint cans

How to make that tree

  1. Starting at the bottom corners, use your geometry triangle to measure a 30° angle, then draw a line measuring 20 cm (8 in).
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. From your new point, measure a downward angle of 25° and draw a line measuring 10 cm (4 in).
  1. From your new point, draw a line that’s parallel with the 30° angle from step 1. The line measures 20 cm (8 in).
  1. Teken vanuit het nieuwe punt een lijn naar boven die evenwijdig loopt met de lijn op 30°. Maak deze lijn 20 cm lang.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you reach the top of the tree.

    Note: The lines of the top will be slightly longer than 20 cm (8 in) to create a nice top.

How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Put the cardboard on your cutting board and use your long ruler and cutter knife to cut the tree out. Be careful when cutting the corners.

    Note: If your cardboard isn’t too thick, you can use a pair of scissors instead.

How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Use the cut cardboard as a template to draw the second part of the tree. Cut this part out as well.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. On both parts, measure where the centre point is, both in lenght and width.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. On part 1, draw a line from the top of the tree to the centre of the tree. On part 2, draw a line from the centre of the tree to the bottom of the tree.
  1. Measure how thick your cardboard is.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Use your geometry triangle to copy the thickness of your cardboard onto the centre line. In doing so, make sure that the centre line remains in the centre of the tree.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Cut the slit you just drew on both parts.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Slide both parts into each other.
How to make a cardboard Christmas tree / Hoe maak je een kerstboom van karton
  1. Use spray paint to paint the tree. Or better yet, decorate it however you like.

    Note: I was only able to paint 1 quarter of the tree with 1 can of spray paint. So if you want to paint the whole tree, buy at least 4 cans. Or buy just the 1, and put the tree up in a very strategic corner.

christmas