Reversible cloud pillow

Since I had a whole collection of raindrop pillows that I made for my guest post over at fortunecookiez.be, I couldn’t but sew a cloud pillow as well.

Blije wolkA reversible one for that. Angry on one side, happy and sunny on the other side.

Boze wolkDo you want to make your own? You can find the free pattern below.

What do you need?

  • Fleece fabric in 2 colours: white and grey
  • Black and red embroidery thread, for the eyes and the mouth. For my first version I used flock film, but it doesn’t stick that well to fleece
  • Pink felt: for the blushy cheeks
  • Stuffing
  • Drawing chalk
  • A small bar of soap

 How to make it

  1. Print the pattern, cut it out, and glue the parts together.
    wolkpatroonpdf
  2. Place the pattern on the right side of the white fleece, with the printed side facing you, and use your chalk to draw it on the fabric.
  3. Add 1 centimeter seam allowance, and cut the fabric.
  4. Flip your paper pattern, with the printed side facing downwards. Place it on the right side of the grey fleece and use your chalk to draw it on the fabric.
  5. Add 1 centimeter seam allowance, and cut the fabric.
  6. Pin both parts together, right sides facing each other.
  7. Sew both parts together, but leave an opening at the bottom, so you can stuff your cloud.
  8. Clip the seams, and pay extra attention to the small corners.
  9. Turn, so the right side is now on the outside.
  10. Stuff your cloud.
  11. Fold the seams of the opening inwards, and sew closed using an invisible seam.
  12. Do the faces:
    • Use the soap (or use chalk) to draw the faces on the cloud, then embroider over it.
    • Take the pink felt and cut out 2 pink circles, and sew them on your cloud.

WolkI prefer to sew the faces on when the pillows are already stuffed, since it gives me a better view of what the end result will look like. Downside is that some stuffing may come out again when you pull your needle through. But you can pick those off afterwards.
Boze wolk

Raindrops keep falling on my head – tutorial

Rain comes and goes, especially in our little country. Not always fun. But when I saw this storm pass on fortunecookiez.be, I was willing to jump right in. So when they asked me to do a guest post with tutorial, I didn’t hesitate for one second.

What do you need?

  • Something round to use as a template to draw the basic circle of your pattern. Think pots and pans, your coffee mug (if you want a small raindrop), your earmuffs, whatever you have lying around. Or you can act like a real professional and use a drafting compass
  • A ruler, paper, pencil and scotch tape
  • Some leftover fabric (size depends on how large a raindrop you want to make)
  • Stuffing
  • For the eyes and mouth: flock film, embroidering thread, googly eyes, you name it

Draw the pattern

If you would like to draw the pattern yourself and make it whatever size you want, draw the pattern as described below. If you would like to use an existing pattern, you can download and print the big or the small pattern, and follow the description on how to cut the fabric further below.

  1. Take your round object and put it on your paper.
  2. Draw a circle around your object and cut out your circle.
    Regendruppel tutorial - stap 2
  3. Fold your circle in four, so you can find the centre point.
    Regendruppel tutorial - stap 3
  4. Use your scotch tape to tape the circle on a piece of paper, so you can draw the raindrop pattern on top of the circle.
  5. Measure the diameter and extend the diameter line on top of your circle.
  6. Divide the diameter by two (yes, the radius) and indicate this number on the extended line, measured starting from the edge of the circle.
  7. Draw to lines from the new point towards the side of the circle, to create the raindrop.
  8. Cut the pattern.

Cut your fabric

  1. Fold your fabric, right sides facing each other.
  2. Put your pattern on the fabric and pin in place.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  3. Draw around your pattern, and draw a 1-centimeter seam as well.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  4. Mark where the opening should come to stuff your raindrop. This should be at the bottom of your raindrop, about 7 centimeters wide.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  5. Cut your fabric.
    Regendruppel tutorial
    You now have two fabric raindrop parts.

Pin and sew

  1. Place both fabric parts on top of each other, right sides facing each other.
  2. Sew together. Don’t forget to keep the opening at the bottom of your raindrop.
  3. Clip the seams, and don’t forget the tip of the raindrop.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  4. Turn your fabric, so the right sides are on the outside. Don’t forget to take good care of the tip.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  5. Stuff.
    Regendruppel tutorial
  6. Fold the seams of the opening inwards, and sew closed with an invisible stitch.

Finish

There are a zillion ways to add a face to your raindrop. I used flock film, embroidery thread and googly eyes.

Regendruppels - afwerking

Avoid getting addicted

Making raindrops goes so fast, that soon you’ll have a complete thunderstorm on your hands.

Boze wolk

But no worries, every cloud has its silver lining.

Blije wolk

Tablet Cover with magnetic strip and camera hole – tutorial

I already put some clothes on the e-readers in this house, but the tablet we got as a gift when we subscribed to our newspaper has been lying around very naked. Time for action.

New cover, again based on the pattern by Eva Maria, but with a magnetic strip and a camera hole.

What do you need?

    • A piece of fabric (size depends on the size of your tablet) and matching (or contrasting) thread
    • Interlining
    • Coloured elastic band
    • Cardboard
    • Ruler, scissors, cutter
    • Magnetic foil (I bought mine at De Banier, but if anyone knows where to find strong magnetic fold, let me know, since this one is not aggressive enough for me)

tablet cover / tablethoes

Get your cardboard ready

  1. Measure your tablet: length, width and thickness.
  2. Add 1 centimeter to each measurement. Meaning: length + 1 cm, width + 1 cm, thickness + 1 cm
  3. Get the cardboard, and cut out the following pieces:
    • The back
    • The side
    • The front
    • Another side
    • The flap to close the whole cover. This is about 1/3 or 1/4 of the width of the tablet. Make it as wide as you want, but make sure it’s wide enough to cover the lens, so it’s protected when your tablet is in your bag.
      Tablet cover / tablethoes

    You now have 5 pieces of cardboard.tablet cover / tablethoes

  4. Take your tablet and measure where the lens is.
  5. Take the backside cardboard piece and indicate where the lens is. Don’t forget that the cardboard is 1 cm wider and longer than your tablet while doing so. Cut out the camera hole, leaving enough room at the side. I cut out a square of roughly 2 by 2 cm, but you could just as well make it round. Place your tablet on the cardboard, to double-check if you made the hole in the correct place.
    tablet cover / tablethoes

Cut your fabric

In total, you need 3 pieces of fabric, and 1 piece of interlining (if you want to add that). To get the size of each piece right, use your cardboard as follows:

  1. Take the backside cardboard piece and place it on your fabric. Draw around it, then add a 1-cm seam. This piece of fabric will be on the inside of the cover, the piece to which you attach the elastic.
  2. Place the remaining 4 pieces of cardboard on your fabric, next to each other. Leave a bit of opening between each of the pieces, since you will need to be able to stitch in between them. Draw around all the pieces, then add a 1-cm seam. This piece of fabric will be on the inside of your cover.
  3. Now place all 5 pieces of cardboard next to each other on your fabric, while leaving a bit of opening between them as you did in step 2. Draw around all the pieces, then add a 1-cm seam. This will make up the outside of your cover.
  4. Use the cut-out fabric from step 3 as a pattern for your interlining, and add the interlining when you stitch the outside and the inside of the cover together.tablet cover / tablethoes

Add the magnetic foil

You now have all the necessary pieces of cardboard (with camera hole!) and you have your fabric ready, so you can stitch up your cover the way Eva Maria describes it. Just don’t forget to attach the magnetic foil to the cardboard before you insert it into the fabric. Do so as follows:

  1. Cut 2 strips of magnetic foil, each about 3 cm wide (I kept the original lenght of the foil itself).
  2. Attach the magnetic foil to your cardboard. You need to do so in 2 places:
      • On the cardboard for the back of your cover
      • On the cardboard for the flap

    tablet cover / tablethoes

  3. If you use interlining, make sure you place the foil so that there’s only fabric in between the 2 pieces of foil when you close the cover (no interlining, or the foil won’t be powerful enough to keep the cover closed)

Make the camera hole

When you have finished your cover, all that’s left is the camera hole. Be warned, it’s fussy to finish!

  1. Take your scissors and make a hole in your fabric where your camera hole will be.
  2. Carefully cut the hole towards the corners, but stop at about 2 mm from the actual corner (as you would do for a welt pocket).
    tablet cover / tablethoes
  3. Repeat on the other side.
  4. Fold the cut edges inwards on both sides, and pin them together.
  5. Sew closed with an invisible stitch.
  6. Finish in the same way as you would finish a button hole by hand.
    tablet cover / tablethoes
    tablet cover / tablethoes

And now, let’s take some pictures!

tablet cover / tablethoes

How to sew a welt pocket with a zipper

When I made the nappy bag, I wanted it to have a welt pocket with zipper. There are several ways to make such a pocket. Below you find a description of how I learned to do it in class. (Sorry for the dark pictures, by the way. It’s winter, you know…)
What you need
  • 2 pieces of fabric of 20 x 20 cm (8 x 8 in) straight grain or 45 degrees of the grain. That’s your own choice. Overlock them before you begin
  • A 15 cm (6 in) zipper
  • A piece of interlining: 6 x 17 cm (2.4 x 6.7 in)
  • A small pair of scissors
  • Pins
  • Sewing chalk
  • An iron
  • A zipper foot for your sewing machine
How to get it all in the pocket
  1. On the right side of your fabric, draw a rectangle measuring 15 x 1 cm (6 x 0.4 in) where you want to insert the pocket. Draw a horizontal line in the middle of this rectangle. This will be your pocket opening. On both sides of the horizontal line, mark 1cm (0.4 in) on the inside of the rectangle. Starting from these marks, draw a line to the upper and lower corner of the rectangle, creating a triangle while doing so.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. On the right side of your fabric, use pins to mark the corners of your pocket. This will help you to draw the corners on the wrong side of your fabric.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. On the wrong side of your fabric, draw a rectangle around the markings: 2.5 cm (1 in) above and below the edge, 1 cm (0.4 in) on each side.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Iron the interlining on the wrong side of your fabric. While doing so, make sure that the pocket opening is in the middle of the interlining.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Draw the pocket opening on the wrong side of your fabric, on the interlining.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. If you haven’t done so yet, remove the pins from the corners of the opening drawing.
  1. On the right side of the fabric, pin one of the pieces of fabric with the right side on the right side over the opening drawing. Make sure to cover 2.5 cm (1 in) on both sides and 3 cm (1.2 in) on top.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. On the wrong side of the fabric, carefully and precisely stitch the outside edges of the pocket opening.
    Note: Start in the middle of a horizontal line, never in a corner.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Cut the middle line carefully until you reach the triangle points.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Cut the triangles very carefully.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Put your hand from the wrong side of the fabric through the opening and pull the fabric through the opening, so the pocket is on the inside.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Trim the edges.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Roll the edges between your thumb and index finger until the seam is neatly folded.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Iron the edges.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. On the wrong side of your fabric, stitch the triangles on the pocket fabric.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Pin the zipper in its place.
    Tip: If it’s easier for you, baste the zipper in its place.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Use your zipper foot to top stitch the pocket opening and thus stitching the zipper into place.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. On the wrong side of the fabric, pin the second piece of pocket fabric on the piece of the pocket that’s already attached to the pocket opening, right sides facing each other.
How to sew a welt pocket with zipper / Hoe naai je een paspelzak met rits
  1. Stitch around the pocket parts, to finish the pocket.
  1. If you haven’t done so yet, overlock the edges. You can also use the overlock to cut the redundant piece of fabric from step 16 off the pocket.
Finished!
Nappy bag / Luiertas

BabyBjörn says Relax – tutorial

This baby bouncer chair is a hand-me-down. I got it from my cousin, and she in turn got it from a friend. Good stuff. But the original cover has some spots that I’m just not able to wash out. So there was a challenge waiting to be accepted.
Babybjörn says Relax
So I got going. With pencil, paper, measuring tape and a geometry triangle. And the original cover, of course.
And this was the result:
Babybjörn says Relax
Reversable, of course, just like the original cover (something I only found out after I’d already started  making this new cover. Little did I know I could just hide all the spots by reversing that thing 😉 )
Babybjörn says Relax
If you’re interested in how to do this, here’s a tutorial:
What do you need?

  • Pattern paper
  • Pencil (and rubber, you never know)
  • Measure tape
  • Geometry triangle
  • 2 pieces of fabric with matching thread
  • Fiberfill
  • 6 buttons

How to draw the pattern?

The cover consists of the following parts:

  • the back
  • the seat
  • the belt
  • the bottom part
  • the tabs onto which you’ll attach the buttons
The back

  1. Put the cover on your pattern paper and use your hands to flatten it as much as possible.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Trace the upper part of the cover with your pencil.
    Note:You may have to rearrange the cover as you do so, to even out the curvy bottom part as much as possible.
  1. Connect the bottom ends with a straight line and cut the pattern out.
  1. Fold the pattern in half, then cut it in half.
  1. Check which of the two halves matches the back the best.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Use the best matching part and place it on the cover with the centre exactly on the centre seam and the bottom exactly on the bottom seam.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Adapt your pattern until it’s exactly right. Check each change you make. When you are absolutely sure that your pattern matches the cover, check it once more.
The seat
Draw the pattern for this part in the same way as you have drawn the back.
The belt

  1. Place the belt on your pattern paper and trace it with your pencil. Trace around the buckles as well, so they’ll be part of the pattern.
  1. Fold the pattern in half, then cut it in half.
  1. Draw button holes as follows:
    • in the middle of the horizontal end, at 1,5 cm (0.6 in) from the side
    • on the centre seam, at 1,5 cm (0.6 in) from the bottom edge
The bottom part
Draw a rectangle measuring 83 cm x 25.5 cm (32.5 in x 10 in)

The tabs onto which you’ll attach the buttons
Draw a rectangle measuring 5.5 cm x 10 cm (2.2 in x 4 in)

How to sew the cover
Preparations
Cut all pattern pieces as follows:

  • Back: on the fold, 1in each fabric, once in fiberfill, add 1 cm (0.4 in) seam allowance
  • Seat: on the fold, 1 in each fabric, once in fiberfill, add 1 cm (0.4 in) seam allowance
  • Belt: on the fold, 1 in each fabric, once in fiberfill, add 1 cm (0.4 in) seam allowance
  • Bottom part: 1 in each fabric, seam allowance included
  • Tabs: 4 in 1 of your fabrics, seam allowance included
Iron interlining on the wrong sides of the tabs and the belt.
And go!

  1. Pin the fiberfill for the back on the wrong side of one of the back parts.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. On the right side of the fabric, draw a vertical line in the centre of the back. On each side of this line, measure 5 cm (2 in) and draw a new line. Repeat until you’ve reached the sides of your pattern.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Stitch all these lines.
  1. Repeat steps 1-3 for the seat, but draw the lines horizontally and start at 5 cm (2 in) from the upper side.
  1. At the bottom centre of the back, using a big stitch, stitch 2 lines of approximately 10 cm (4 in). Do not secure your thread and leave quite some thread on both ends, so you can easily use it to wrinkle.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Repeat step 5 for the seat, wrinkling the curvy part.
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Pin the back on the seat, right sides facing each other and wrinkled parts against each other, so you create a seat already.
Babybjörn says Relax
Babybjörn says Relax
  1. Fold the tabs in the width, right sides facing each other. Sew the long sides.
  1. Turn the tabs so the right side is on the outside. Iron flat and stitch along the sides.
  1. Pin the tabs on the right side of the back that’s lined with fiberfill. Make sure they are pointing inwards. Pin a tab on both sides of the back and one at bottom of the seat, in the middle. Check the correct positions with the original cover.
  1. Pin the bottom part on the seat, right sides facing each other. Sew together.
  1. Repeat steps 5-7 for the remaining parts. Pin the tab you have left on the bottom of the seat, in the middle, and repeat step 11.
  1. Pin the belt parts on top of each other, right sides facing each other. Sew together, but make sure you leave a hole to turn the whole thing through.
  1. Turn the belt so the right side is on the outside. Sew the hole closed using a blind stitch.
  1. Sew the button holes on the belt.
  1. Turn the cover so the right side is on the outside. Sew the buttons on the tabs.
    Note: The tabs on the sides need a button on each side.
Babybjörn says relax
  1. Finish the hem (2 cm / 0.8 in).
Babybjörn says Relax
Finished! Doesn’t that look a lot better than the original spotty cover? Careful, though. The original cover secures your baby with a special system. On Justina Maria Louisa’s blog, I saw she used buckle belts. I’m not too big a fan of these, since I always get my fingers in between (that’s why my camera bag is never closed properly). I certainly wouldn’t want to get my boy’s fingers caught in them either. So I chose to use plain old buttons. Works fine, but make sure to always tug the belt a bit, so it’s really tight around the button. I wouldn’t want to see my boy bouncing around the room without his bouncing seat.
Babybjörn says relax
Materials used

How to use flock film

As promised in my Pimp your onesie post, here’s a tutorial on how to use flock film.
What you need

  • A onesie (or any other piece of clothing), neatly washed and dried
  • Flock film in any colour you like
  • A cutting board
  • An art knife
  • A printed-out graphic
  • Scotch tape
  • A pen, preferably one that writes on smooth surfaces
  • A hot iron and an iron board
  • A (clean) hanky
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
How to pimp your onesie

  1. Using the cutting board and art knife, cut out the graphic.
    Note: You can also do this using a pair of scissors.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Place your graphic on the shiny side of your flock film.
    Note: Put it on there in the same way as you want to see it on the onesie, no mirror image needed.
  2. Use Scotch tape to attach your graphic to the flock film, so it won’t move.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Optional: Trace your graphic with a pen.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Cut along the edges of the graphic.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
See how fast I’m cutting!
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Iron your onesie so the surface where you want to add the graphic is smooth and wrinkle-free.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Place the flock film graphic on your onesie, shiny side up.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Place your hanky on top of your graphic.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. With your iron on full heat, iron for approximately 30 seconds, applying gentle pressure while doing so.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Let your onesie cool down completely.
  2. Gently remove the shiny plastic film
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
  1. Finish by ironing the inside of your onesie.
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie

Extra tip

Always double-check that the shiny side is up before you iron the flock film on. If not, you might end up with a very fancy hanky, as I did.

How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie
Washing instructions

  • Machine wash warm, water temperature should not exceed 40°C or 105°F
  • Use washing powder only, no liquids
  • Wash and iron inside out
  • Do not tumble dry
  • Do not bleach or dry-clean
How to use flock film / Hoe gebruik je flockfolie

How to replace an elastic waist band

When my mom found out I was pregnant, she went digging into hidden family history boxes. You know, like the ones in the movies, where they wipe away a thick layer of dust before they open them, ready for a trip down memory lane. At least, that’s how I picture how it happened. Up she came, with some teeny tiny baby clothes my brother and I used to wear.
How to replace an elastic waistband
I fell in love with these clothes immediately. Talk about vintage! Part of the treasure were these cute light blue pants.
How to replace an elastic waistband
Only problem: their elastic waistband had lost the meaning of the word ‘elastic’. But that was a problem that could quickly be solved.
Materials needed

  • Elastic
  • Seam ripper
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine
  • Special needle to pull elastics through tunnels or safety pin
How to replace an elastic waistband
How to replace the elastic waistband
  1. Measure the height of the waistband. You’ll need an elastic that’s a few millimeters smaller than that.
    Example: For these pants, the waistband is 1 cm, so I used an elastic that was 8 mm wide.
  2. With your seam ripper, tear up the stitching for about 2 cm.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Cut the old elastic and remove it.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Measure how long the new elastic should be. The easiest way to do this is to wrap it around the waist of the person you’re changing it for. Don’t forget to stretch it out as it would be when they wear the garment. Add about 2 cm extra and cut the elastic.
  2. Pull your elastic through the special needle, or pin your safety pin through it.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Slide your special needle or safety pin into the opening you made, and gently slide it further through the waistband tunnel.
    Careful: Make sure you don’t pull it through completely, keep hold of the end so you will be able to join both ends.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Fold the ends over each other.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Stitch the ends with your sewing machine.
How to replace an elastic waistband
  1. Tug your waistband, so the elastic goes in it completely.
  2. Close the gap you made, either by hand or with your sewing machine.
How to replace an elastic waistband
There you have it, one very vintage pair of baby pants ready to be worn.
How to replace an elastic waistband
And of course there is a matching shirt (also from that dusty box of memories) and hairdo 🙂
How to replace an elastic waistband
One happy vintage baby, who’ll grow as strong as his uncle.
How to replace an elastic waistband

How to sew a double-welt pocket

I don’t know why, but I like the look of double-welted pockets in skirts and trousers. They are both elegant and practical at once. So I thought I’d use them in my husband’s retro trousers.
Double-welted pockets seem hard to make, but in fact, they aren’t. The most important thing while making them is to be very accurate. So if you concentrate hard and take your time for it, you should do just fine.

To help a hand, I’m going to describe how to make one. The measurements I’ve used are those of a standard double-welted pocket. Keep in mind that there are different ways to make this type of pockets. This is just the way I do it.
What you need

  • 2 pieces of fabric of 20 x 20 cm or 8 x 8 in, straight grain or 45 degrees of the grain. That’s your own choice. Overlock them before you begin
  • A piece of interlining: 4 x 20 cm or 1.5 x 8 in for light and regular fabrics, 6 x 20 cm or 2.4 x 8 in for heavier fabrics
  • A small pair of scissors
  • Pins
  • Sewing chalk
  • An iron
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to get it all in the pocket
  1. Draw a rectangle measuring 15 x 2 cm/6 x 0.8 in on the right side of your fabric where you want to insert the pocket. Draw a horizontal line in the middle of this rectangle. This will be your pocket opening. On both sides of the horizontal line, mark 1cm/0.4 in. From these marks, draw a line to the upper and lower corner of the rectangle, creating a triangle while you do so.
    Note: If you’re using a heavy fabric, draw a rectangle of 15 x 3 cm/6 x 1.2 in.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Use pins to mark the corners of your pocket. This will help you to draw the corners on the wrong side of your fabric.
Outside Inside
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Iron the interlining on the wrong side of your fabric. While doing so, make sure that the pocket opening is in the middle of the interlining.
    Note: For this pocket, that means that the interlining covers 2.5 cm/1 in extra on the left and the right of the pocket, and 1 cm/0.4 in above and underneath the pocket.
  1. Draw the pocket opening on the wrong side of your fabric, on the interlining.
    Note: There are several ways to do this. I myself prefer to use carbon paper, because it is fast and accurate. To make sure that the drawing is still clear, I draw over the carbon lines with sewing chalk as well.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. If you haven’t done so yet, remove the pins from the corners of the opening drawing.
  1. On the right side of the fabric, pin one of the pieces of fabric with the right side on the right side over the opening drawing, making sure that you leave 2.5 cm/1 in on the sides of the opening, and 3 cm/1.2 in on top (5 cm/2 in if you drew the larger opening for heavier fabrics).
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. On the inside, carefully and precisely stitch the outside edges of the pocket opening.
    Note: Start in the middle of a horizontal line, never in a corner.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Cut the middle line carefully until you reach the triangle points.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Cut the triangles very carefully until the corners.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Put your hand from the wrong side of the fabric through the opening and pull the fabric through the opening, so the pocket is on the inside.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. If necessary, carefully cut the cut edges, so they are exactly 1 cm/0.4 in wide (1,5cm/0.6 in if you are using a heavier fabric).
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Arrange the pocket and the pocket opening, and iron.
  1. Sew the pocket closed.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Stitch the triangles to the outer edges of the pocket opening, so they stay in place.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. On the right side of the pocket, stitch through the horizontal edges of the pocket (Sorry forgot to take a picture here).
  1. Pin the second piece of pocket fabric on the piece of the pocket that’s already attached to the pocket opening, right sides facing each other.
    Note: The second piece of the pocket will be larger than the first piece. That’s normal. Just cut it to the same size once you are ready.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. Stitch around the pocket parts, to finish the pocket.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
  1. If you haven’t done so yet, overlock the edges. You can also use the overlock to cut the redundant piece of fabric from step 16 off the pocket.
How to sew a double-welt pocket/Hoe naai je een paspelzak
Finished! The best practice is to keep the pocket sewn closed until your garment is finished. That’s why I cannot add a picture of the finished pocket just yet 🙂

How to hand sew a blind hem stitch

Using a blind hem stitch is the best way to hem garments without stitches being visible. You might be able to do so using your sewing machine, if you have the right presser foot. But keep in mind that you can only use your machine for heavy fabrics. If you do so for lighter fabrics, you will still see stitches on the outer side of your hem.
In my opinion, the best way to sew a blind hem is doing it by hand. It takes longer, but it looks better. And, on top of that, it’s also a great excuse to what, say, Grey’s anatomy while doing it 😉

Preparations

Before you start, you need to make sure that you have prepared your garment well:

  • Turn your garment inside out.
  • Iron your hem. Make sure that you have at least 0,5 centimeters/0,2 inches hem allowance left (on the inside of your garment).
  • Fix your hem with pins.
  • Get your needle and thread ready. Since this is going to be a blind hem, you can use any colour of thread you like, but I prefer to get a colour that is very similar to the garment. Don’t use too long a thread, or it will get tangled. 50 centimeters/20 inches should do the trick.


Do the hem

  1. Start at a seam. This gives you a better overview of your progress. For trousers, for instance, I always start at the inner leg seam.
  2. Fold the upper bit of the hem allowance towards you and hold it in place with your thumb.
  3. Make a few local stitches to fix your thread.
  4. In the folded-over hem allowance, gently pick up a fibre and pull your needle through.
    blind hem stitch

    Note: As you may be able to see in the picture, I’m left-handed. The right-handed way looks exactly the same way, except that your needle point will look the other way.

  5. In the garment itself, pick up a fibre and pull your needle through.
    blind hem stitch

    Note:

    • If you’re left-handed, move your needle from left to right, but stitch from right to left.
    • If you’re right-handed, move your needle from right to left, but stitch from left to right.
    • Your hand never shadows the stitches you’ve already done.

  6. Repeat steps 4 to 5 until you have completed the hem.
  7. When you have completed the hem, make a few local stitches to fix your thread.

The result looks as follows:

blind hem stitch
Once you fold the hem allowance back in place and turn your garment outside in, no stitches will be visible at all.

How to edge stitch

The edge stitch is something I’ve always found very hard. Either I just stitched next to the garment, or I was swirling instead of stitching right. So I asked my teacher how to do this best. And actually, it’s quite easy, I don’t know why I never thought of it myself.

  1. Make sure that your needle is in the middle of your presser foot.
  2. Now, the second step depends on the type of presser foot you have. In general, you will have to place your garment with its edge in the middle of the smaller part between the middle of the presser foot and the right presser foot toe, looking like this:
    edge stitch

    Now, it may be possible that the middle part of your presser foot is not smaller, like mine. You can then still aim at the middle between the middle and the right toe, looking like this:

    edge stitch
  3. Stitch gently, while keeping your eye on the middle of the right toe. 

You’ll be amazed at the result: tada!

edge stitch